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Eggs Benedict

Posted by cemmerich in athletes, bread, breakfast, Condiments, crab, gluten free, high fat/moderate protein, main dish, nut free, Paleo, PURE PROTEIN/FAT DAY, restaurant options 13 Jan 2014

Testimony of the Day

“Growing up as a kid, I didn’t even realize that my food options were actually going to help me out one day. What can I say, I am a “meat eater”. I always got a lot of slack about not eating the bun or fries that come with my meal, but I just didn’t have the taste buds for that stuff. I just craved meat and especially meats fried in good oils. I wasn’t aware that my diet options would eventually affect my athleticism and structure as I got older and needed to be more aware of those things while in sports. I have eaten this way my whole life, but I feel so good when eating this way and it has helped my energy level and has also helped me “beef up” while going through High School and now into my College football career. We are put on a weight lifting routine and this diet has helped me to reach my goals and become in the best shape ever. And secondly, I DO NOT drink. Hard to believe, I know. As a college student you would think I would be doing the partying and drinking. But I don’t consume alcohol in any form due to the detrimental effects it has on everything that I am trying to achieve. I feel like I am in the best shape of my life and full of energy and it’s due mostly to my food choices of Low Carb, High Fat diet and no alcohol intake. These things along with my weight program make me feel stronger than ever and able to achieve my goals.” -Ericson

If you want to look like Ericson, click HERE for a consult. With the right diet and supplement plan, you can feel like a new person!

 

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People mistakenly think that they need to exercise to create a calorie deficit in order to lose weight. This is not how exercise helps with weight loss. Exercise builds muscle and muscle builds mitochondria. It is in the mitochondria where fat is oxidized so you can keep your cells and liver insulin sensitized. Even personal trainers misguidedly believe that exercise is about the calorie expenditure. It is about hormones and specifically insulin.

BENEFITS OF KETO-ADAPTED DIET WHEN Exercising

1. It improves insulin sensitivity and speeds recovery time in-between training sessions. Low carb diets are anti-inflammatory. This produces less oxidative stress while exercising, which speeds recovery time in between exercise sessions. This is why I was able to run every day while training for my marathons.

2. It spares protein from being oxidized, which preserves muscle. Branch chain amino acids are considered essential, because your body can’t make them, so you need to consume them for proper muscle building and repair (as well replenishing red blood cells). What I found so interesting is that BCAA oxidation rates usually rise with exercise, which means you need more if you are an athlete. BUT in keto-adapted athletes, ketones are burned in place of BCAA. Critics of low carb diets, claim that you NEED insulin to grow muscles; however, a well-designed low carb/high fat diet there is less protein oxidation and double the amount of fat oxidation, which leaves your muscles in place while all you burn is fat!

Jimmy Moore from Livin’ La Vida Low Carb did an experiment while he was and still is on a keto-adapted diet. Jimmy writes, “When I was in the midst of my own personal n=1 experiment of nutritional ketosis in 2012, I decided to see what was happening to my body fat loss and muscle mass growth using a DXA scan. I had one done in September 2012, started a 20-minute slow lifting program every three days, and then got another DXA again two months later in November 2013 to see what changes would take place. I was stunned to find that I not only lost over 16 pounds of body fat but I also simultaneously GAINED over 6 pounds of muscle! I’ll be sharing much more about the power of a high-fat, low-carb ketogenic approach on so many aspects of health in my book KETO CLARITY coming in June 2014.” To read more on his keto adapted journey and muscle gain, click HERE to check out his blog.

3. It decreases the build up of lactate, which helps control pH and respiratory function. A myth of low carb diets is that it puts you in a state of acidosis.

“This stems from the unfortunate fact that many doctors confuse nutritional ketosis (blood ketones at 1-3 millimolar) with keto-acidosis (blood ketones greater than 20 millimolar). In nutritional ketosis, blood pH at rest stays normal, plus sharp drops in pH due to CO2 and lactate buildup during exercise are restrained. By contrast, in keto-acidosis, blood pH is driven abnormally low by the 10-fold greater buildup of ketones. Suggesting these 2 states are similar is like equating a gentle rain with a flood because they both involve water.” (pg 35 of The Art and Science of Low Carb Performance).

4. It improves cognition. Ketones aren’t just fuel for our body, but they are also great for our brain. They provide substrates to help repair damaged neurons and membranes. This is why I really push a high fat/low carb diet for clients who suffer from Alzheimer’s (type 3 diabetes) and seizures.

5. It doesn’t damage our immune system and less free radical damage in our cells. Free radicals are highly reactive molecules produced in the mitochondria that damage protein tissues and membranes of the cells. Free radicals happen as we exercise if you are a “sugar burner.” But ketones are a ‘clean-burning fuel.’ When ketones are the fuel source, ROS (oxygen free radicals) is drastically reduced. Intense exercise on a high-carb diet overwhelms the antioxidant defenses and cell membranes which explains why extreme athletes have impaired immune systems and decreased gut (intestinal) health. A well-designed ketogenic diet, not only fights off these aging antioxidants, it also reduces inflammation of the gut and immune systems are stronger than ever. (2) After reading this, I am no longer concerned about taking all the anti-oxidant supplements that I do! I also don’t worry about getting as many anti-oxidants in my food like with veggies and definitely not with fruit!

TIP: I keep my bread and buns in the freezer at all times to make sandwiches and to bring with me at restaurants.

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Eggs Benedict
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: breakfast
Cuisine: American
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • PROTEIN BUN:
  • 3 eggs, separated
  • ¼ cup Jay Robb unflavored egg white protein (or whey protein)
  • ½ tsp fresh dill or other herb of your choice
  • HOLLANDAISE:
  • 6 large egg yolks
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • 2 TBS Dijon mustard
  • 1½ cups melted organic unsalted butter (or melted bacon fat or duck fat if dairy sensitive)
  • ½ tsp Celtic sea salt
  • ⅛ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • ADDITIONS:
  • 6 ham or prosciutto slices
  • 12 large eggs
Instructions
  1. To make the BUNS: Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F.
  2. Separate the eggs (save the yolks), and whip the whites for a few minutes until VERY stiff (I use a stand mixer on high for a few minutes).
  3. Gently mix the protein powder and herbs into the whites.
  4. Slowly fold the reserved egg yolks into the whites (making sure the whites don't fall).
  5. Grease a cookie sheet with coconut oil spray and place mounds of "dough" about the size of a hamburger bun onto the sheet.
  6. Bake for 20-30 minutes or until golden brown.
  7. Let completely cool before cutting or the buns will fall.
  8. Make hollandaise sauce: In the bottom of a double boiler or in a medium saucepan, bring 1 in. of water to a simmer over high heat and adjust heat to maintain simmer. Put egg yolks, lemon juice, and mustard in top of a double boiler or in a round-bottomed medium bowl and set over simmering water. Whisk yolk mixture to blend.
  9. Whisking constantly, add butter in a slow, steady stream (it should take about 90 seconds). Cook sauce, whisking, until it reaches 140°, then adjust heat to maintain temperature (remove from simmering water if necessary). Add salt, pepper, and cayenne and continue whisking until thick, about 3 minutes. Adjust seasonings to taste. Remove from stove and set aside.
  10. Assembly: Place 2 bun halves on each plate and top with ham.
  11. Poach eggs: Bring 1 in. water to boil in a 12-in.-wide pan. Lower heat so that small bubbles form on the bottom of the pan and break to the surface only occasionally. Crack eggs into water 1 at a time, holding shells close to the water's surface and letting eggs slide out gently. Poach eggs, in 2 batches to keep them from crowding, 3 to 4 minutes for soft-cooked. Lift eggs out with a slotted spoon, pat dry with a paper towel, and place 1 egg on each ham covered protein bun.
  12. Top each egg with 2 to 3 TBS reserved hollandaise sauce and serve hot.
  13. POACHING EGGS TIP: add a few tablespoons of coconut vinegar to the simmering water you poach the eggs in. This helps hold the whites together.
Notes
NUTRITIONAL COMPARISON (per serving)
Traditional Benedict (IHOP) = 1020 calories, 57g fat, 43g protein, 80g carbs, 6g fiber
"Healthified" Benedict = 675 calories, 64.2g fat, 23g protein, 3.4g carbs, trace fiber (85% fat, 13.6% protein, 2% carbs)
I first met Ericson over a year ago when Kai was just a baby. Kai would cry if I wasn’t holding him. Craig couldn’t even comfort baby Kai. At the time it was exhausting for me to always hold Kai and be able to get everything done, but now I sure miss those days. Now he is so independent!

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  • Wenchypoo October 13, 2013 at 1:03 pm / Reply

    Hubba-HUBBA!! If more football players looked like that, and played with no shirts on, I might learn to become interested in football ASAP!

    • cemmerich October 13, 2013 at 3:22 pm / Reply

      Ha! :)

    • AM October 15, 2013 at 8:14 pm / Reply

      Ding ding ding! We have a winner! I second this :-)

  • Chipper October 13, 2013 at 2:07 pm / Reply

    Sounds good. In these testimonials, I keep looking for ideas to help me cook.
    I have a 10 yr old that is not even willing to taste any meat. Not sure how to help him. He wants to play football but his body isn’t looking like Eriscon’s. His 5yr old sister will not even eat meat. They will eat Wendy’s chicken nuggests so I know it is a choice and not a meat issue. I have to pick my battles so I don’t want to turn every meal into a war. This war will last for a long time. Even sending them to school if they don’t eat the food ends up with me picking them up after the nurse calls because they don’t feel well or are sick. They will choose to go to bed without food when given that choice.
    To get them to try vegetables is a crying match to see who will win. Not sure where they got their genes from, cause we are meat eaters. If I use coconut oil for making pancakes, they can taste the difference. For breakfast, I added unflavored hemp powder to the pancake mix. I add hemp powder to their spaghetti sauce when I can sneak it in. One day I goofed and added nutritional yeast to the sauce and it thickened up so much, I had to toss it. Adding extra water to it turned it into goo. I almost got caught. I’m working on cookies to see how I can alter them and still have them looking and tasting like the original cookie. Pumpkin cookies seem to be the best at cheating ingredients. Smoothies work well for spinach but they will only drink so much. They weren’t raised this way. Not sure where the signals got changed. They won’t eat nuts or raisins. Not sure of my next move and I’m not looking for a response or answer. Just wanted to say that changing a family’s diet is not as easy as it is written. Your posts have shown that Starting from babyhood is the answer.

    • cemmerich October 13, 2013 at 3:24 pm / Reply

      Starting at baby is ideal. Have you tried my Kids cookbook. Lots of familiar options for kids Healthified in there. I have had mothers tell me their picky eater prefers the chicken nuggets made from the recipe in that cookbook. :)
      http://mariamindbodyhealth.com/my-books/

    • sam October 13, 2013 at 7:55 pm / Reply

      I also have a picky eater, and have spoken to parents who have involved occupational therapy as a way of helping their picky children. Sometimes in our effort to get them to eat, our methods actually perpetuate the problem.
      This link may have some information for you: http://www.100daysofrealfood.com/2012/12/07/picky-eater-vs-problem-feeder/

    • Kymm Bradley October 14, 2013 at 3:44 am / Reply

      You have the perfect solution. He wants to play football.

      Simply tell him that boys who do not eat meat do not have the big, developed muscles
      needed to be fast or strong to play football or basketball or any other fun games without getting seriously hurt or without embarrassing themselves by being seriously BAD at it

      SO if he wants to do play with the big dogs, he needs to realize that as a “man” he needs to develop a taste for meat.

      Bottom Line…No meat No Football EVER

    • Donna February 7, 2014 at 2:05 pm / Reply

      You are not alone! I have a child who has been extremely picky since being weaned! If she refuses dinner, she will spend half of the next day throw ing up stomach acids. Then once she eats again she will be fine. I switched my children over to almond flour/coconut flour recipes for breakfast (she won’t eat eggs) and I have found that in the ten months we have all been sugar/grain free, with me always having muffins or something available, they have all started to try more things. My picky eater is nine and it has been a long haul with her. I had to cut her hair short when she was six because it all was falling out due to her refusal to eat! But with focusing on family dinner around the table, she is gradually trying new things. Last night I made homemade sausage and although she didn’t eat more than one bite…she ate one bite!! Take heart, this can change. Your eating example combined with no unhealthy options at home will make a difference eventually. As for school lunches, what a nightmare. The school is very controlling to make an issue out of food. It’s not like they offer healthy food anyway so who cares if the children don’t eat it! I know it’s a pain, but can you send lunch? I homeschool my children, so I don’t have to deal with this, but I know my picky eater would never survive school lunches. I believe this can change for your children, one small bite at a time. Children have free will too so just keep offering healthy options only, but kid friendly ones like Maria makes, and you are doing your part. That’s all you can do.

  • […] Truly Healthy Eggs Benedict: Breakfast of Champions […]

  • Kim D October 14, 2013 at 3:57 am / Reply

    Made this for my husband and I for brunch today. Although it does take a while it was delicious. Any ideas for the leftover hollindaise sauce??? Will definitely make again! Thanks Maria!

    • cemmerich October 14, 2013 at 7:59 pm / Reply

      Thanks! I put hollindaise on everying (over fish, on a lobster roll, etc.) :)

  • Kim Stephenson October 14, 2013 at 10:18 pm / Reply

    I love following your articles and posts. I have read several of your books and love them too! I am interested on your thoughts about the “latest” carb cycling diets. High/moderate and low days with carbs. They seem to think you can’t “low carb” it forever and that your body needs this unpredictability to lose weight/build muscle. Not being a dietitian, this stuff gets so confusing. It seems like everybody has a point…. your thoughts please.

  • France October 15, 2013 at 9:39 am / Reply

    Maria, have you tried hollandaise with coconut oil? I came across that today (from my curiosity then googling!)… I’m thinking half coconut oil and half bacon fat would be YUM!!!

    • cemmerich October 15, 2013 at 10:30 pm / Reply

      That sounds yummy! :)

    • cemmerich October 15, 2013 at 10:31 pm / Reply

      That should work. :)

  • Mishy October 15, 2013 at 6:46 pm / Reply

    Step 11 must be from another recipe as it says “place one egg of each crab topped eggplant” :)
    can’t lie crab topped eggplant sounds pretty good too….

    • cemmerich October 15, 2013 at 10:39 pm / Reply

      Oops. Thanks. I fixed it. :)

  • […] Benefits of Keto-Adapted Diet when Exercising […]

  • […] playing. Alzheimer’s is considered to be Type III Diabetes by some doctors, after all. And this guy plays football on a keto-adapted diet, so the old argument that athletes MUST work on glucose […]

  • Gail October 16, 2013 at 7:04 am / Reply

    Maria,
    I just recently bought your 30 day Accelerated all in one pkg. I notice on your blog you talk about making protein bread for you and the Amazing bread for Craig. What is the deciding factor on who gets what or is it just personal preference based on taste?
    Thanks,
    Gail

    • cemmerich October 16, 2013 at 2:12 pm / Reply

      It is based on your metabolism and goals. Men have more muscle mass and can handle more carbs typically. Also, if trying to lose weight and heal, protein bread is best. If in maintenance mode, amazing bread is ok for some, others (with diabetes,etc.) may still not be able to have it. ;)

  • carrie October 16, 2013 at 6:13 pm / Reply

    I made the protein bread a couple weeks ago, following the recipe exactly (especially being careful with the egg whites). It came out very “styrofoamy” & reminded me of a rice cake, for consistency. Any idea what I did wrong, or is that what’s it’s supposed to look like?

    • cemmerich October 16, 2013 at 6:43 pm / Reply

      I wouldn’t call it styrofoam, but it is a spongier texture than wheat bread.

    • Lynnette December 5, 2013 at 7:06 am / Reply

      I got the same texture :( Very, very dry and hard

    • cemmerich December 6, 2013 at 8:59 pm / Reply

      Try using half the listed protein powder. Especially if using egg white protein. That will make it less dense. :)

  • C Lyons October 21, 2013 at 5:58 pm / Reply

    The brand of ham in the photo’s would be very helpful, thanks so much Maria!!!

  • sjanette October 27, 2013 at 1:32 pm / Reply

    I’ve just made the bread 2 times. First time I set the oven on fan at 165 degrees celcius for 40 minutes. They came out very dry, They broke when I touched them. The second time I had my oven on convection (Top and lower heat) on 160 degrees celcius for 40 minutes. Again they came out dry. Is that good or bad??? ;) Are they supposed to be soft like real bread or “crunchy”

  • Brenda November 13, 2013 at 12:46 am / Reply

    Does anyone know if these buns would hold up for a few days to a week if I made them ahead of time? 40-45 mins is just a long time for me to make for one meal. It is just the hubby and I….but I work 2 PT jobs and have school full time. My husband works a lot more than I do so to have 40-45 mins for one meal is a lot of time. I try to cook on my days off and save it for the week.

    • cemmerich November 13, 2013 at 2:29 pm / Reply

      These should last for a week in the fridge. :)

  • Joy November 27, 2013 at 9:56 pm / Reply

    Any other options for the whey protein of egg white protein? I do not have these on hand. Thanks so much for all your work Maria! <3

    • cemmerich November 27, 2013 at 10:20 pm / Reply

      Sorry, protein powder is needed for this one. :)

  • Emma February 7, 2014 at 12:51 pm / Reply

    40-45 minutes? wow! how many buns does it make with only 3 eggs and 1/4 cup of powder? And, should you whisk the yolks before folding in, or just leave them whole?

    • cemmerich February 7, 2014 at 5:23 pm / Reply

      I make 3 buns and when done cut in half. :)

  • momof3 February 8, 2014 at 2:34 pm / Reply

    I would like to make the hollaindaise sauce, but I’m curious how many servings the recipe above makes. Could you let me know?

    • cemmerich February 8, 2014 at 2:42 pm / Reply

      If you used 3 tablespoons per serving, it would be about 16 servings. :)

  • Michelle February 16, 2014 at 6:55 pm / Reply

    That was pure awesomeness….yummy tangy sauce…..aaaaahhh!

    • cemmerich February 16, 2014 at 9:40 pm / Reply

      Thanks!

  • Toni March 2, 2014 at 1:22 pm / Reply

    I made the buns yesterday and, although they looked beautiful, they are dry and crunchy. My question is why does the bread loaf bake only 20-25 minutes and the buns bake 40-45 minutes? It seems that is too long for them.

  • Terra March 3, 2014 at 2:06 pm / Reply

    Same thing here with styrofoam. Knock the time down to 15 minutes and see what you get. I did 30 minutes first time and it was certainly not edible. Same with angel food cake- half the time made a big difference.

  • at March 8, 2014 at 12:33 pm / Reply

    Maria, thanks for your inspiring recipes! I usually have a keto omelet (3 eggs, 3 Tbsp butter, a bit less than 1/2 tsp salt) for breakfast and it makes me feel great! However, this breakfast doesn’t seem to help me recover after a 30min morning run (no food before that). I feel like going back to bed. What are your thoughts? Thanks!

    • cemmerich March 8, 2014 at 2:13 pm / Reply

      Do you use butter in the sauce? If so, not sure what could be different from what you described.

  • […] breakfast sandwiches: grain-free buns (from the fridge), sausage, avocado, fried […]

  • Kat April 3, 2014 at 5:48 am / Reply

    Dear Maria, I just finished reading “Keto-Adapted” and WOW what an eye opener! I cannot believe it’s actually been less than 3 weeks and I’M DONE WITH SUGAR! Woohoo! :)

    I am using Stevia drops when called for and I am surprisingly satisfied. Thank you for that!

    Still….
    Even though I’ve JUST started eating low carb, mod protein and high fat as you instruct in the book I’ve already GOT to have some bread! I’m ready to order some of the protein powder ASAP and make some protein buns!
    In your book (like this article) you have included the nutritional info on the protein buns PLUS the eggs Benedict can you please tell me the info on the buns alone?

    Also while wanting to lose 20-25 lbs I’m challenged by menopause, chronic fatigue and depression so which book (s) do you recommend next? Would Secrets to Controlling Your Weight Cravings and Moods be a good one to start next? And will it include more recipes?

  • Emma April 11, 2014 at 3:52 pm / Reply

    Hi maria – few questions!

    for the buns, did you use convection? I have a convection oven.

    And, assuming you whisked the yolks smooth before folding in?

    • Emma April 11, 2014 at 3:56 pm / Reply

      also, why is the cook time so much longer on this than the crab blt protein bread/rolls? O:

      • cemmerich April 11, 2014 at 8:46 pm / Reply

        I updated it above. They have better consistency with shorter cook time. :)

    • cemmerich April 11, 2014 at 8:45 pm / Reply

      Yes, convection. And yes. :)

  • Emma April 12, 2014 at 12:31 am / Reply

    Thanks! Now that I’ve perfected hollandaise (it’s a forearm workout! ) eggs benedict is one of my favorite keto breakfasts.

    • cemmerich April 12, 2014 at 1:32 pm / Reply

      Yes it is, but worth it! :)

  • M. April 28, 2014 at 1:43 pm / Reply

    What is the percentage of fat, protein, and carbs of the hollandaise sauce? I make mine with half bacon fat and half coconut oil. I love that sauce, so delish! :)

    • cemmerich April 28, 2014 at 3:13 pm / Reply

      It is almost all fat. It is 97% fat, 2% protein and 1% carbs. :)

  • Paula June 30, 2014 at 4:34 am / Reply

    If you are dairy sensitive and don’t have bacon or duck fat, could you substitute MCT oil for the butter? Thanks.

    • cemmerich June 30, 2014 at 1:45 pm / Reply

      Yes! :)

  • Josie August 15, 2014 at 10:21 pm / Reply

    What is the best way to rewarm the hollandaise sauce. When I rewarm it the sauce isn’t a smooth consistency anymore. It tastes okay but I would love it to look creamy. Maybe over a water like when you make it?
    Thanks!

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